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is there jeopardy for us? >> so the notification and education program survey and early notification portions are the sort of the new pieces that aren't required by state law. we are using those outreach efforts, those outreach components to inform who we talk to in the actual statutory opt out phase. we are not suggesting that anyone who is going to be served by cleanpower sf would not receive an opt out notification. anyone who wishes to participate can participate which sounds like opting in, but we won't enroll them after we have included them in an opt out process. so i think we have worked with the city attorney on this to make sure we are accurately understanding our obligation and that our approach is consistent with it. we think it is. and so we're not always this careful with our language as we should be, but the actual steps will be anyone who says "let me in" will receive and be included in the opt out portion of the program. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> can i add also the people who are seen in the green area that are saying "i don't want to be in the program". they
for your children's education, a golder ticket to a college education. i'll tell you how your kids can guarantee a return on that investment. oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to to enter. a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. officeyour business needs...k... at prices that keep you...out of the red. this week get a bonus $15 itunes gift card with any qualifying $75 ink purchase. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. >>> congratulations, you've done everything right. you set aside money for retirement while saving for your children's college education. every spare dollar has gone into that 529 plan, and you will not be saddling your kids with $26,000 in student debt. that's the average in. no, not you. you sacrificed. brace yourself. here's what a new study from the university of california merced concludes -- th
the others. i mother was a special-education teacher. [cheers] my dad worked on the army base. my parents were crystal clear about what they wanted for us and that was an education. so a lot of what we did to give back was in the educational arena. i love that president obama house the same values. he knows that, for our nation, and education cannot be a luxury. it will strengthen the middle- class and strengthen the work force will keep some of davis -- that will keep us innovated. if you're thinking about how you can search or how you can follow the president's example to honor this national day of service, start with this. make a difference in one child's life. mentor a student. donated book to a library, doenitz applies to a neighborhood school. -- donate a book to a library, donate supplies to a school. i am here because i have someone looking out for me. i'm telling you how important my education was. someone was pushing me to succeed. but i want to make sure the next generation has that as well. so last year, when i launched the eva longoria foundation, i focused on helping advance
read your articles every day for the past year or two. you have educated me. you have enhanced my knowledge of a lot of things that i have heard that comes out of the republicans or conservative talk-show hosts by criticize obama. after reading your article, i found out what i hear on a rush limbaugh and the michael savage show was absolutely a lie. host: you give us an example? caller: a whole solyndra tuition. i found out the facts by reading your article in our local paper. the whole solyndra thing started with the bush administration. guest: thanks for the kind words. i am glad that you are reading them in your local paper one thing we are trying to do, as much as we can, is get our work out in different ways. we have partnerships with television stations. have partnerships with newspapers. the one you are read for into in atlanta uses the truth-o-meter on state and local officials. i am glad to hear you are reading our work and their work and i am happy our word is getting out host:politifact looked at issues -- looks at issues like energy. what to do find overall? guest: a l
, and for people who are interested in education and children, i was sort of surprised to find him on my door step. excuse me. so i didn't know enough about him to really say "yes" so i decided to ask around about him. l you can imagine the surprise i heard from people. they loved him. he was beloved by everyone that i respected in education and politics, so i decided to call him and meet with him, and on our first meeting we had so much fun that i decided -- who cares? at least i will have fun with this guy. not only did have fun, but he trownsed most of the city that year in voter turnout. since most of my political focus is education and children i'm not someone you should ask to run your campaign lightly. i think henny will tell you that. i will vet you intensely and get in your face, and i will question your beliefs, and i want to make sure you're serious about service in education, and it's funny as milton was he was very serious about service to his city. for some people the call to politics is great. for some it is ego or path to money or power or corruption. some people are call
of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but defi
? that they will be fine, that they will survive? i think we can all agree when we began our careers in education, we did it because children deserved better. to thrive and placed in situations to be successful. our jobs. mine, yours, are to remove those obstacles in front of them. and to do our best to give them that path to success. moving this will place a major obstacle in their way. these are students that have dealt with years of ada construction. and last year there was a fire and they were without a cafeteria and not to mention lost every book in the library. they have had to endure so much. and those who could help, and you are about to throw a huge obstacle in our way. i ask is this the best you can do? have you consulted with all parties? are you proud of the work you have done, and the decisions you are about to make? in my opinion unless you have received the answers that you are satisfied with, then you hand the work back to them and say, try again. [applause] >> good evening, i am melissa, the president of the board of creative arts charter school. i appreciate the opportunity to give comm
to acknowledge the noe valley merchants' association for their exemplary commitment to education and assist businesss in noe valley on disability access requirements. the noe valley merchants' the association understands that continued disability outreach and education is about maintaining the economic preservation of their merchant corridor and it is the only merchants association in san francisco that has established a standing committee to develop comprehensive outreach -- excuse me. that establishes a standing committee and developed a comprehensive outreach and education program and assist businesses that are in pre-and post-litigation. the small business commission commends the noe valley merchants association as an outstanding merchants association not only for their dedication to the businesss in their districts, but also for being a strong citywide and statewide voice for businesses and individuals with disabilities around the issue of disability access compliance. so thank you. [ applause ] so i just have a few other notes. is that the noe valley merchants association has made th
professionalism, experience and dedication help the district achieve its goal of equal access to quality education for all of its students. effectiveness of core substit e substitutes could be improved if their jobs were assigned no later than the night before. that was always practiced before previous years. currently jobs are assigned on the morning of the assignment. despite all reasonable efforts to reach the sights on time. it may be that we arrive late, this creates stress for the school staff and disrupts the student's learning routine. thank you. >> good evening commissioners. congratulations president norton and vice president fewer. and good evening superintendent. my name is darlene ania, and i am here today in my capacity as vice president of substitutes with uesf. i wish to direct attention to a problem that has impacted our students and schools for the entire fall semester. though initial steps have been taken to remedy this situation, i believe that this is an important issue which should be kind of spotlighted right now. so we don't have this same problem next year. the problem is
the details of the early notification and education plan there, the framework is clear and i think it's a good starting point to move forward for the city and i believe that while we have had comments about talking about caution i think they're well meaning how to have a successful program but i think the success of the program is that we roll out quickly with the notification and the education plan. that's going to be most meaningful. i also want to make sure that we're really clear that the effort is really working in the deep green areas first and foremost where we know a particular target audience is for the message and we know how to craft that message for them as well. i think that is going to be significant. we're not reaching out to every population in san francisco from the get go but the deep green area is where we need to focus the efforts on. this plan incorporates that and i believe it's the right way to go. i would like to move forward approving something today that can later be implemented early next year and hopefully we can move that in that direction. commissioner olagu
that the education system must instill the value of strong minds and that brings strong change. take your child to school. meet your child's teachers. exchange numbers. turn the tv off at night. take a report card every nine weeks and take your child to religious celebration once a week. most of the violence is from the bottom up, not top down. mothers say something like "i'm going to beat you boy. i'm going to beat you so the police don't have to do it one day". it was their own way of saying get some home training, some home cultivation is a big fact in the social order and we must restore homes but unemployed parents don't do as good job as parents with jobs. i'm all about welfare back to work. there are four steps involved. one the parents must have day care. if you leave the child without day care you're called an unfit parent and are arrested. you need day care. you need transportation and job training and a job. you need those four steps. what gives you an advantage in san francisco with the mayor across the bay and mayor lee here you have leaders that care. we have leaders h
are part of the solution. in that effort both in advocacy we have a strong, strong goal of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means
floor. that print studio is nationally known for its artwork and its educational programs. for the youth guidance center, i just spoke about the presentation that we did for the ada transition plan. we're requesting $400,000. that is to do all the design and architectural construction drawings and obtain building permits for a $3 million project to be funded in 2014-2015. we are also requesting some funds for miscellaneous general services projects. in our master planning efforts that go on to support all of these projects, that is at the level of $400,000. and let's see, we do have some other funding requests in 2014-15. under the plan, we must plan for a two-year cycle of budget requests. and also a ten-year capital plan request. so we're looking at sun setting our funding in 2015. and it will take us through 2015, almost all the way through that year to complete the construction of all of our projects. these funding requests are separate from curb ramp and sidewalk ada transition plan funding projects. all right? so these are the architectural buildings. and that is the end of my re
in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context.
of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these
are not scholars. they are not someone who comes from an educational background or was taught that in their household. they do not know how to differentiate how to make the right choices. they just know what they have been taught. i am speaking from personal experience. i went to high school and i graduated with a 1.7 gpa. we ran the school, literally. i went to kennedy high school in richmond. it is surrounded by three or four different components. constant shootings -- three or four different hoods. we had to have our varsity football games during school hours. we cannot have it at 7:00 because of the potential danger. there was constant substitute teachers, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you
of it. where to begin? no matter what your leanings are and whether you know about education or not, let's turn to some of the language you are talking about. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment. we know that because the first years of life are the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time. which brings me to the next point, yes, we have class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out of the national dialogue on poverty and hunger. that is a bipartisan effort, to keep people who are poor out of the national dialogue. that is why i work with low income women to be able to take photographs and provide direct testimony on their experiences with raising children in poverty, how to break cycles with poverty, and there are so many conversations happening. this concept of violence and the trail. people have been silenced for so many years. -- betrayal. people have been silenced for so many years. poverty is solva
. hamburger helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on every box, it helps you help your school. so you're doing good, just by making dinner. hamburger helper. available at walmart. i just finished a bowl of your light chicken pot pie soup and it was so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> we need to report the death of police officer shot and killed in sacramento continue. officer kevin tongue was killed by suspected burglar. 35-year-old canine officer had been with the force since 2 thousandths 9. before that he was a firefighters and medic. he was respond to go burglary in the city of galt near stock top. confronted suspicious person. man resisted pulled a gun and shot the officer. he then turnede gun on him 7. shooting comes less than two months after animal control officer was shot and killed also in galt. >> the tight state bump it could be leading to an increase in crime. it has to do with court or
of service and to educate small businesses on action steps to achieve accessibility compliance. dbi is meeting with the office of small business to determine the most appropriate use of these very limited funds. and which are the result of passage of senate bill, 1186 by the state legislature last september so that is something that is important to us based on the conversations in the past. >> acting director, director and i have recently met with the office of small business to executive director to discuss ongoing compliance issues around the number of vacant commercial storefronts. >> it does not appear that it could effectively address, vacant storefronts especially in buildings otherwise occupied. we remain available for follow up discussions on these issues. these conversations are helpful and we obviously can't accomplish the goals all of the time. but at least the communication we can come up with creative ways of assisting these issues to the department. >> dbi along with other departments is participating in the data survey, at the request of small business and the mayor's
. there is a disadvantage to a piecemeal bill, if you pass, for example, issues for educated people to get a visa, and they're taking care of, you lose a certain amount of support for the other issues. i do not think we should decide that. i think the senator is doing a great service by raising this issue. i think our colleagues at this meeting, i met this morning with the person -- he and i actually talk a lot. i believe we should move forward on all of the arrangements so that the hill will develop an understanding about all of these issues and finally decide whether they will do it in one, too, or three pieces. that is the least of our worry. the fact is they do it. we will continue to talk about a comprehensive bill. >> i am delighted that senator rubio is helping folks take the issue of immigration reform as seriously as he is taking it. he is providing leadership on that and we are appreciative. i think it is great to see movement on both sides of the aisle. whether or not it is comprehensive or individual pieces is to be determined by leadership in the house and senate in consultation with the presi
thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don'
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
and there continues to be i think a robust debate in this country about whether education issues are local issues, whether they are federal issues, and what should be done. and there are a number of people --. >> tom, let me jump in. bullying is hardly unique to school day. >> uh-huh. >> so why in the broadier sense is there not a federal definition of bullying that transcends local jurisdiction on schools? meaning, we know what bullying is when we see it. everyone may have a variation, about why isn't there a broad definition? >> certainly in the south philly case, a number of those kids were dealt with in the local criminal justice system because they committed an assault, a pretty serious assault. so that's -- bullying has a continuum. that's the extreme end of the continuum. but then you see what happens on twitter and facebook and the things that occur there and that becomes a lot more challenging to come up with a definition that is sufficiently clear so that it can give guidance to local authorities and also respectful of constitutional first amendment issues of that nature. so it's a
responsible for partnering with school districts and departments of education across the country to help children and youth learn how to think critically, behave safely and participate responsibly in our digital world which we all have heard brings its own complications. she oversees the department's education staff, working in the 3 largest districts in the country, new york, denver, maine, texas, florida, and the bay area. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome rebecca randell. >> great, thank you, melinda. i'm going to ask you all to come up now. as they get seated i'll say a few words. all these panelists really bring a great wealth of experience and wisdom to what on the one hand is actually a really complicated issue and on the other hand at its very core is somewhat simple. whether it's online or off-line, bullying and harassment or as the teens that we encounter at common sense media often say, drama, it's about power. as you heard the boy on the video say, i'm the big dog. who has it, who wants it and who wants to keep it. i realize this is an incredibly simple defin
have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this fiscal deficit, our fiscal policy is an enormous cloud on us reaching that potential and i work on the investment banking industry i used to be in the money-management industry. there is a phrase that sometimes
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particul
reduction, investments in education and manufacturing, immigration reform, gun safety. so on the issues the president intends to really push and focus on, there's massive support in the country, even among republicans. let's not lose sight of that, and that's why we're going to do a better job in the second term-- while we're going to do all we can to work with congress and negotiate, to also make sure the american people are connected to what's going on here. i think to really get the kind of change here in washington the american people are going to demand it. but there is really, i think, consensus around eye lot of the issues around the country >> what about the idea the republicans have said they will go along with the three-month extension on the debt ceiling, increase? are you going to be-- does that help? >> well, it's helpful that they have now dropped their demand, that the only way they're going to pay the country's billes, they themselves racked up, would be to extract some concessions. we've got to never again have this threat to the global economy and our economy because c
were my parents, who dedicated their lives to serving others. my mother was a special education teacher. yay, teachers. my father worked on the army base, but my parents were crystal clear on what they wanted for us, and that was in education, and so what we did to give back was in the educational arena. i love that president obama has the same values. he knows that for our nation, a good education can not be a luxury. it is imperative that we will create jobs, strengthen the middle class and build a workforce that will keep us innovative and in a global market. like you, he knows that giving our students the tools they need to succeed is the best way to give back, so if you are thinking about how you could serve or follow the president's example, to honor this national day of service, start with this -- make a difference in one child's life. mentor a student. donate a book to a library. donate supplies to a neighborhood school. help to paint a classroom, or clean up a playground. all in terror at an afterschool program teach a class to adults who never want bridget -- volunteer at an a
of linking education with worse force development. making the united states more economically competitive by investing in community colleges, by improving our education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that he can lead four years from now with a america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity. >> i have to check in with the reporters around town. brooke baldwin. can you hear me? >> reporter: you hear correctly. i can barely hear myself speak. i'm a southern girl. it's my perfect place. they're playing a very significant song right now. this is simple plman. i was talking to them backstage. they say this is the one song they sing. they sing at concerts like this all the time. we have heroes in the room. our men and women in military. many of them in wheelchairs to my right who have made it out here. they are trying to move forward. the guys in the band say the song just resonates. neez men a these men and women are simple men and women. yourself missing out. >> you look absolutely the part in that dazzling outfit. let me move to anot
in terms of linking education with workforce development. making the united states more economically competitive in the 21st century global economy investing in community colleges, improving the education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that, he can leave four years from now with an america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity in the 21st century. >> wait a moment. we have to check in with reporters around the town now. brooke baldwin at the red, white and blue ball. brooke, can you hear me? you are with military leaders and lynyrd skynyrd, i hear. >> you hear correctly, my friend. i can barely hear myself speak and so glad you came to me. i don't know if you can hear. i'm a southern girl. i'm in my perfect place hearing the southern rock band lynyrd skynyrd. playing a significant song. this is "simple man." i was talking to them backstage and they said they sing at concerts all the time. that is hero's red, white and ball here in washington. the men and women of military, many of these guys just in wheelchairs to my right
is no longer illegal, and some christian educators have continued to teach the book of genesis as science. in 2008 bobby jindal passed the science education act which encourages teachers to bring in their own supplemental material when teaching controversial subject such as evolution. but then teachers excluded evolutionism but creationism. and that is what forced students like zach koplan to speak out. >> christians have claimed that it promotes critical thinking. you don't need a law to teach critical thinking in science class. critical thinking is fundamental to the scientific amal method. >> john: joining me now is that very young man, zach koplan at rice university who is leading the fight to repeal the louisiana science education act thank you for coming on the program and for your service to science, and christianity. >> thank you. >> john: what made you speak out on this. >> the louisiana science education act passed in 2008, it was something that had been on my radar since then and symbolized everything that could be embarrassing about my state. i mean, you probably know there ar
education. >> abc 7 news is at san jose state university. governor brown is praising the university's efforts. >> happening now, san jose state launches a pilot program to offer online courses for credits. governor brown on hand for official announcements. the goal toin crease access to higher education and reduce costs. san jose state partnered with the silicon valley start up called udacity two. math and one statistics class, each costing $150. the governor says online education is a key component in soflg the state's education crisis. >> it's an experiment. we're going to learn together that. is how i think we'll succeed f we stumble, we'll stand up and try something else. >> for now, size will be limited to 100 students. half of the seats reserved for community college students. courses begin at the end of the month. udacity's ceo says other states are expressing interest. >> still ahead on abc 7 news at 4:00 walmart's pledge to create jobs in america and help it's giving veteran autos then at 4:30 what is next for lance armstrong now that he's admitted to using performance-enha
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
justice -- getting education is a social justice issue. we don't want kids to feel they can't go to school or go home. we want other's worth intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a diffe
that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions so you don't get to talk anymor
issue. you know, other panelists mentions republican versus democrat, i am interested in the education system, and making it affordable for everyone. >> this is a political move in colorado, the republicans voted a long party lines every year they are trying to pass this. >> what are you saying malia this is not a littl political m? >> i'm saying, is to her point, unfortunately all these issues, which should be discussed under this idea of america, give me your here and humble is being turned into politics, it is misleading to think that somehow democrats are only ones that make this political, this has not come out of the blue, this has been going on for years, this is not out of the blue, people want -- as much as i don't like what happened in arzante. neil: here is what can it comes down, to do you give up addressing this issue in serious terms at all. do you say, make them all legal, and then we'll deal with any new ones coming in. >> perhaps this is something that supreme court will have to look to. in '882 supreme court ruled that immigrant children who were undocumented were gua
, six teachers and educators were taken from us at gun point. an act of senseless and incomprehensible violence struck at the heart of our families, of our schools, of our communities across the country. earlier this month shortly after newtown, all members of congress took an oath to protect and defend the constitution and the american people. to protect and defend, that is our first responsibility. today leaders of the house democratic caucus have come together to fulfill that duty to confront the challenge of gun violence in our society to enact, to ensure the safety and security of our communities. under the leadership of congressman thomson, mike thompson, our gun violence prevention task force keeps growing in number. our colleagues are submitting recommendations for legislation, the task force is working with outside organizations, and sharing the latest information on gun violence and steps we can take and must take to end it. today to strengthen the efforts of this task force and our democratic caucus, we will hear from americans with personal and professional experiences with
to succeed in today's market place. despate progress in education, too many of our schools are still lagging behind, some way behind and especially heart breaking to this father, one in five hoosier children lives in poverty. that is simply unacceptable. [applause] with so many families and business struggling just to get by we have no choice but to remain bold. we have to do better and we will do better and doing better starts with the right priorities. by adopting a road map that says yes to our future and believes in the ununlimited potential of our people and it start by making job creation job one in this assembly and all over this state. [applause] that's why on day one of our administration i signed a moratorium on any regulations to ensure that indiana is not burdening hoosiers employ remembers unnecessary red tape and that's why we proposed a job budget last week. our budget is honestly balanced holds the line on spending, funds our priorities, builds our reserves and it lets hard working hoosiers keep more of what they earned. now let's be clear: government doesn't create jo
of our board of education, -- mendoza. with that, mr. mayor, would like to join us? (applause) >> i would like to give our mayor the opportunity to say a few words on today's occasion. >> thank you everybody. happy new year! i wanted to be here the congratulate the supervisors who have been reelected, as well as the new elected supervisors and to welcome those families and friends who have come along way i'm sure, whether working with the newly elected, or alongside all of us for many years. i want to acknowledge the public officials that have been identified in the commissioners and department heads, for being here today. a sincere congratulations to board president chiu for you nomination in your reelection as board president. i look forward to working with you and with the whole board to continue the success of our city and to make sure that the dialogue but we have just heard, whether the celebration that supervisor yee had last night or london had today - sorry, supervisor breed, we are all still calling ourselves each by our first names - we continue making sure that the
to the meetings. he was a true believer and wanted to make it a better educational facility. many of his friends who are here and they would agree if you wanted someone in your corner you wanted milton. and there was a question that he had a temper and he did not and we had a bully in our neighborhood that was beating me up and milton made it clear physically that is not going to happen again. i am proud to say my son carries milton as his middle name and there is no one else that could carry that name. sam has many of the characteristics like my better and people to help people and he truly cares. that is the one thing that will always set my brother aside. he truly cared. he did not make it up. it wasn't for politics. it wasn't to make friends. he cared. milton will be remembered for many things. for me he will always be my brother, and amazing father to three wonderful boys and faithful and loving husband to his wife abbey. i love you milton. [applause] >> and it's now time to hear from a colleague and friend in public service, state senator mark leno. [applause] >> thank you peter an
years now, the first day of my second term, has been one of continuous education. i want to thank you for that. i want to introduce my family. i'm getting emotional. first off my beautiful wife karen cepeda [sounds like]. (applause) together we have two kids, renee and emiliana who are in school today. we have been through what close couples go through in terms of raising kids and facing adversity and figuring out how to make a household work. it has been wonderful 15 years. my mom is year, linda parks and stepfather. (applause) i think that what i really got % most of all from my mom % is really how to think and be thoughtful about the people. and i take that with me wherever i go. i draw inspiration from being around people. i want to say thank you for my life and what you have given me. my stepfather joe has given me a great opportunity, never expected that and i want to thank you for that. i wanted to do is my dad, hector avalos. it's time for resemblance i tihnk, for the gray look. my dad is important to me as well and taught me about the value of work. working with oth
the state reserve. i have no problem spending in our kids education, to draw from our state reserve to put us further in the hole to me is the wrong approach. >> supervisor campos. >> supervisor campos i would like to begin by welcoming once again our newly elected colleagues, supervisors yee and breed. it is exciting when we take our own new board of supervisors, and i look forward to working with you. there are many votes that we cast in this chamber and in some respects it is only fitting that one of the first votes that this new board starting its new term takes is his vote. this is one of the most important issues that we will be dealing with in one of the most important vote that we will be taking as his term proceeds. supervisor kim, i want to thank you for your leadership but i want to piggyback about what supervisor avalos said, talking about in some respects two different cities. and what happens to some people in san francisco. we are a city of great wealth. we have because of a lot of different reasons we are fortunate enough that we have more resources in san francisco then
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
. that there is one more thing. so the educational system in college. i think there should be services for financial aid for individuals with disabilities. as you are abruptly thrown into the world with lots of action going on and it's a very hard transition. particularly if you are furthering your education, for folks with disabilities, particularly with financial aid. this is why most individuals don't go to college. that is all, thank you. >> thank you. are there any council members who have a comment or question? go ahead idell. >> thank you. thank you everyone for coming out here today. i have to apologize, i have been sick, so i didn't even know that the meeting would have happened. i would have had a lot more people here. sorry about that, but the next time we do this, which i know this won't be last one, it will be go. what i wanted to say is having access -- she was talking about the internet -- having cable or something at a reasonable price. we have people with disabilities and seniors just siting this their house just looking at wall because they cannot afford cable or a telephone
agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a moment. >> nancy did mention that we will announce the winners of
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
to make a motion to divide the question. one, about the 1.1 million dollars about the public education enrichment fund and separately 843 million dollars from the general fund's stays federal reserve. initially i wanted us to divide the file entirely to send two files to the mayor who indicated that he would sign it so that we could get the 1.1 million to the school district immediately. >> motion to divide is not debatable. will consider those two items. supervisor mar. >> i want to support the whole -- supplemental brought by supervisor kim. i want to speak to the accountability of the school district. another the former school board president, norman yee and others have successfully brought the school district to a stronger financial state. they have achieved a perfect score in the recent audit; never before has any governmental agency seen that. it's a good testament to the work that the former president of the school board jay kim and our colleague norman yee have done. also the sfusd action plan to presented the plan at the previous financial meeting showed that it was mone
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
deeper anymore. i don't have a formal education in i.t., however, i have deployed some systems when i was working for the industry, and i brought in young, energetic staff to help. we implemented this. it took three months. people knew when they were going to get paid. i think we have a happy contractor community. >> these system improvements have really it increased service to our clients and reduced costs and really improved the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac f
revenues earmarked for higher education, but now the csu and uc boards could still raise student fees. >>> a new national study suggests the more money parents contribute to their kids' college education, the lower their grades will be. uc sociology professor laura hamilton told the "new york times" the effect is modest, not big enough to make students fail out of college, but it's surprising because parents assume the more money they give, the better their child will perform in school. >> let the kids work! >>> latest census shows a shift in california's population. latin immigrants no longer make up the majority of the state's immigrant population. instead, it's immigrants from asia. 42% of immigrants coming to the state were from latin america, 37 from asia. a decade later, 57% from asia, more than two times the 22% that come from latin america. >>> well, it's green and a bit extreme. a new garbage collection program may be in store for palo alto, with fewer bins and more sorting for residents. cbs 5 reporter elissa harrington explains how it all
a better education ark good education and so we adopted jonah. i was actually at his birth in 1997. and in 1997, didn't know any black jews. gary was concerned because he had been associated with city planning and part of the naacp expert witness in housing discrimination, he was concerned he had lost a lot of friends in the '60s as black power came to the rise. so again, since we are a research institute, we asked a lot of people a lot of questions and we -- in 1999, the study of ethnic and racial diversity in the jewish community and as part of that process, we did focus groups in the bay area and we did focus groups with black converts, with some of that large cohort of children who were the product of sexual politics of the '60s with one jewish parent, black parent. >> we have just a little bit of a time with the two of you together. so i wanted to also just ask jonah just, if you can give us a sense about your experience of growing up here in san francisco, what that was and continues to be for you? >> let me just continue one second to say
year of the washington. you want to start an interesting conversation. ask this well-educated well- connected crowd. what was more important, the first time barack obama was elected. first african american president or the fact that he was just real. let's go inside. i want to tell you some of what they had to say. >> reporter: the historic theater was jumping on stage with the kind of jazz they want to improve. >> i want them to leave the president alone. >> reporter: but outside the upscale gathering waited. >> they have a little more power. >> they have supported president barack obama a second time. and their money, their campaign, and their votes. >> mitch mcconnell said he would be a one-term president. four years ago a line of symbolism and it was. a lot of people are telling us tonight they are looking for programs from the president from this point on. >> on gun controls, barack knows what to do. >> i'd like to see him focus more on education. everything starts with education. >> reporter: they are headlining this private inaugural party. planning to be here well into the
to the public and the media. >> female college students are turning to creative methods to pay for education. a list of rankings is showing schools with the most students, who are searching for sugar daddies. the dating website put out the list, it connects sugar daddies with sugar babies or mutually rewarding relationships. georgia state in atlanta topped the list of schools, nyu second, temple is third. >>> other higher education news, a study finds the more money parents contributed to the kids education the lower their grade. it's not a big enough effect to make the students fail out of college but parents assume the more financial support they give the better their child will x<perform in school. >>> weddings are popular, there are a lot of brides out there, right now planning for their special day. as elizabeth tells us tonight, there are plenty of people out there planning to take advantage of the brides to be. >> they treat brides and grooms like human atms. >> they are the authors of bridal bargains , the wedding industry doesn't want you to read. over the span of 24 years, they my
, and forefront of education and teacher tenure and evaluating school performance. she believes that great teachers and great schools can lead to great futures for america's children. >> this is the country of equal opportunity. this is the country where if you work hard and you do the right thing, you're supposed to be able to live the american dream. but, it's not a reality for our children, who grew up in poverty today because they attend failing schools, where they don't gain the skills and knowledge that they need to see that success in the long run. we owe them so much more. >> michelle rhee, the ceo and founder of students first, is an educator who believes that children, regardless of their background or circumstances can achieve any goal if they receive a great education through great teachers who put their students first. for 18 years, michelle has been involved in helping children become their best. right out of college, she became a teacher with teach for america, a in one of the poorest communities in baltimore. the achievement levels were low due to violence, poor nutrition a
was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wond
career she has shown a constant and loving commitment to education and improving the lives of children. in addition to having served as superintendent of schools in three different connecticut communities, janet has served as a teacher, a school counselor, and a school psychologist. i met janet in the fire house which was the emergency center of newtown, connecticut on the afternoon of the shooting. janet was grieving. she was there with parents of children who didn't know if their children were going to come home. as we know, 20 of them did not. the next morning this brave woman sat around a conference table with members of her community and began plan on how to protect those children and their family. how to reopen the school and get children back to learning. she was putting sandy hook community first, the teachers, the children, and those families. she did it all the time with her heartbroken for her friend who is were cut down on that terrible day. janet, i know you will provide invaluable expertise to us. you are an expert on children, on teaching, but most importantly, and for o
is education. >> and the mayor says baltimore city schools des have thely need the cash to reach the goals. she says in order to educate children, more money is needed. >> heating systems, cooling systems, so we can make sure kids won't miss school when the temperatures rise. we need to make sure we're able to build new schools in neighborhoods that need new schools and we need that funding source. >> in the budget, governor o'malley has already budgeted $346 million. >>> now to the breaking news we brought to you first on good morning maryland. the algerian government is in the middle of an operation to free house tajes held in a compound. >> 10 were held but five are safe. the status of the others is unclear. the rescue operation is still far from over. >> reporter: the algerian military as attacked a gas facility where terrorists are holding people including americans. there has been casualties but they won't confirm. >> i think we have to prepare ourselves for the possibility of bad news ahead. >> reporter: secretary of state hillary clinton has been in contact with the algerian prime minis
health in terms of research, education, and policy. >> when you look at what has been that in the past, it has not got this very far. we have to do something we believe a national discussion, putting aside preconceived notions will have us move forward as a nation. >> for more, we're joined by colin goddard. on april 16, 2007, he was shot four times when a gunman armed with a 22 caliber semiautomatic handgun, 9 millimeter semiautomatic, went on a rampage at virginia tech. 32 people were killed. he and 16 others were injured. colin goddard now works with the brady campaign to prevent gun violence. he just returned from meeting with survivors and their parents in newtown. the british campaign was the first trip to meet vice president joe biden's task force on guns, and later colin is headed to the white house to attend president of his announcement on gun-control. he is joining us from washington, d.c.. welcome back to "democracy now!" though the announcement has not been made as of this broadcast, president obama says he is calling for a ban on assault weapons, and high-capacity magazin
apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote the smashing pumpkins, we all know what we're after, we just have to get there faster. we all know we need a clean energy economy, where it's really, really cheap to buy the energy and where the energy th
that judgment and now you have to work with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain differen
an overhaul of college as we know it. how california is trying to make higher education more affordable. >> we're live tonight in san francisco international airport. the idea of a name change has little lit up conversation on the abc 7 news facebook page. >> if you're tired of the cold snap, so, we all set? i've got two tickets to paradise! pack your bags, we'll leave tonight. uhh, it's next month, actually... eddie continues singing: to tickets to... paradiiiiiise! no four. remember? whoooa whooaa whooo! you know ronny, folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? happier than eddie money running a travel agency. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >>> sky 7 live over the mission district. the s.w.a.t. team and hostage he s.w.a.t. team and hostage suspect out of the home. >> this is the 20th avenue and anza street in richmond no. word on what the man did that brought police to his door, police say he barricaded himself inside and refused to come out. >> they're not saying if he is armed but no
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
for effective bullying prevention programs. there are other elements of staff training and educating students about what to do in a bullying case and our program we teach kids the 3r's. recognize, report and refuse bullying and we talk about the power that the bystanders have and the things they can do to make a difference and at a whole school level training adults and i want to put this out here and this is something that we know is very important. >> so alixis we heard a number of times today is takes a village and not just about programs in schools and not just about schools and families, but what is out there in the air, and mia has worked with sesame workshop. you target a slightly older age group. talk to us about your piece of the puzzle. >> i am happy to. could i have the next slide? that's not mine. and that's not mine. >> it doesn't look like cartoon network. >> maslow's hierarchy. >> sorry. back up. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, sp
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
a lot of dreams. he was hard working, and he taught us to value education. he taught us that here in this country we wouldn't go far if we didn't have an education so he taught me to dream a lot of dreams that i don't know if i would have dreamed op my own. i'm grateful to my father for, you know, encouraging me to dream big, and he would always say, you know, just because we're undocumented tennessee doesn't mean that we cannot dream. >> host: so what's your relationship with your mother? what was your relationship? >> well, my mother, she was, you know, very good mother up until the point when she took off to come here to the u.s.. when she came here here, her experienced changed her a lot. she did not have a good experience in the u.s.. my father left her for another woman, and when she came back to mexico, she was very bitter and broken hearted about the whole experience, and she changed, too, as a mother. she was no longer interested in being our mother. she was more interested in finding someone to heal her broken heart. i lost my mother when she came here because the woman
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